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Teens and Indian Health Service: Saving Both

by Resa Crane Bizzaro

Over the years, much of my writing has been in response to news articles. Among stories about Native Americans that have spurred me to write essays is an Associated Press story of another sort: disturbing statistics indicating the attitudes of teenagers about their future lives.

After I saw the story in the Raleigh (NC) News and Observer reporting general research that suggests the hopelessness of young people, I obtained the article the story was based upon from the July 2009 issue of


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Teens and Indian Health Service: Saving Both

The Next Seven Generations: Reclaiming Healthy Sexuality for Native Youth

by Jessica Yee

I am proud to be Native. I am also proud to be a woman. I am proud to know that I have so much to honor in my ancestors’ teachings that show me how to live as a young, strong, proud, Native woman in this world. It is something that excites me every morning when I open my eyes, and something I realize I could not live without.

It was not always this way. Like many First Nations youth today, I grew up unaware of my culture and felt disconnected in the big, thriving metropolis of Toronto. I was fed up of people outside the community dictating to Native youth how to be “healthy,” but not actually involving us as youth on any sustainable level. Information was rarely …


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The Next Seven Generations: Reclaiming Healthy Sexuality for Native Youth

Healthcare Compromise: Low-Income Women Get Bumped

by Jen Nedeau

Democrats in the Senate got what they wanted this Christmas: a passed health care reform bill.

Low-income women, however, seemed to be the ones with coal in their stocking.

Led by Vice-President Joe Biden, the 60-39 vote along party lines on December 24, 2009 ensured that this historic bill will move forward and potentially become law if the House and Senate can reconcile their two different versions of the legislation in 2010. The House will begin the reconciliation process on January 12, 2010 and the Senate on January 19.

The New York Times


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Healthcare Compromise: Low-Income Women Get Bumped

Race and Gender: Two Lovers Who Dare to Kiss

by L.A. Bailey

What would happen to America if race and gender decided to unleash their passion and proclaim their undying love, respect, desire and need for one another?

What would happen if the two achieved their collective vision and birthed a dream of a world that deconstructs and eliminates barriers that block the progress of women and people of color?

What would happen if today’s African American leadership followed the convictions of the Civil Rights Movement and didn't settle for the mere replication of hegemonic practices in the black community?

Or, what if women created systems of change using a female-driven paradigm instead of believing that …


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Race and Gender: Two Lovers Who Dare to Kiss

Book Reveals Difficulties of Traditional Chinese Gender Roles

by Angela Poh

Heroines of Jiangyong: Chinese Narrative Ballads in Women’s Script, translated by Wilt L. Idema, is the first English translation of the folk literature of Jiangyong County in Hunan, Southern China. This small county is unique because its women penned their songs and poems in “women’s script” (nüshu) up until the middle of the twentieth century.

Idema begins the book with a short introduction to nüshu: it is not a language, but a system for writing the local dialect of Jiangyong. These texts directly reveal the voices of peasant women in Jiangyong, and provide a rare …


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Book Reveals Difficulties of Traditional Chinese Gender Roles

White Silence and Responsibility

by Clare Coss

What is the role of the artist as we strive to understand issues that divide us? How do we recognize and care about the equality of others? What is my responsibility as a playwright?

As a child I journeyed back and forth between my parents in New Jersey and my grandparents in New Orleans. The collision with Jim Crow laws in the south, made me aware of white privilege in the north. White supremacy became obvious. I began to care about moral survival.

My imagination leads me to women characters who go where the silence is. They are drawn to confront inaction and tyranny, to confront fear, to find the courage to act.

In my new play,


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White Silence and Responsibility

In Peril: North African Freedom Fighter On Hunger Strike

by Cindy Cooper

Editor's Note: Urgent circumstances call for early publication of this story planned for our Winter 2010 edition on women of courage.

Aminatou Haidar, known as the "Gandhi" of the Western Sahara for her advocacy for the human rights of her people, sat on a mattress provided by the Red Cross in the Lanzarote airport in the Spanish territory of the Canary Islands. She declared a hunger strike to the death on November 15 and only takes sugar and water.
 
Hundreds of people gathered outside the airport to express support for the tall woman with a simple headscarf and glasses. Within days, prominent Spanish actors made their way inside the terminal to be by …


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In Peril: North African Freedom Fighter On Hunger Strike

Population & environment: a progressive, feminist approach

by Laurie Mazur

In "The 'New' Population Control Craze: Retro, Racist, Wrong Way to Go" ( in this edition of On The Issues Magazine), Betsy Hartmann implies that everyone working on population-environment issues is part of a misogynistic plot to bring back "population control."

I'm here to tell you she is wrong. (See Betsy Hartmann article here)

I am a lifelong, card-carrying feminist and political progressive. I am passionately committed to sexual and reproductive health and rights, to environmental sustainability, and to closing the inequitable divide between men and women, rich and poor. …


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Population & environment: a progressive, feminist approach

Black Abortion: Breaking the Silence

by Maame-Mensima Horne

For years reproductive justice activists have been calling for African American women to break the silence around abortion within our communities. Instead, a new wave of anti-abortionists -- the black religious right -- has been gaining strength, usng a “Black Genocide” argument. This theory was originally started by Marcus Garvey and members of The Universal Negro Improvement Association (U.N.I.A.) that he founded in 1914. Now, it is used to further the agenda of the black religious right and push African American women into the background.

Many African American women hide, afraid of the stigma that can …


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Black Abortion: Breaking the Silence

Wise Words Cause Fearful Notions

by Serena Garcia

The ascension of Justice Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court of the United States in fall 2009 seemed to hang on hyped reaction to statements that she made in a speech eight years ago, even as much of her impressive record as a judge for nearly two decades was ignored. The most interesting aspect of the "wise Latina" controversy, as it came to be known, may be the amount of fear that the elevation of this talented woman caused for a certain segment of the population.

“Sotomayor was vilified for choosing to call herself a woman of color, a proud Puerto Rican, a wise Latina,” wrote Liza …


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Wise Words Cause Fearful Notions
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