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Healthy Masculinities: A Pro-Human Endeavor

by Josie Lehrer

Before a standing room-only house at the debut presentation of the Men’s Story Project in August 2008, Kenyatta, a 60 year-old writer from Harlem, describes how, at the age of seven, he proudly shared with his parents a poem he had written. Since many contemporary African American poets were gay, they glared at him with suspicion and disapproval. For the next 30 years, he never shared a single piece of his writing with his parents for fear of bad consequences.

Reading a letter he wrote to his father, Robert Haaland, the first transgender candidate to be elected to San Francisco public office, declares that his …


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Healthy Masculinities: A Pro-Human Endeavor

“The Heretics”: Film Invigorates Feminism, Art, Politics

by Ariel Dougherty

Exuberance and bravado! Gumption and sweat! Vision and breadth! These are among the many elements that composed the literal collective experience of 28 women who came together in 1977 to produce one of the truly dynamic women’s publications to emerge from the Women’s Liberation Movement.

That publication was Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics. The energy and commitment lasted 15 years and produced 27 issues, which are viewable online. Today the rosy cheeks, bright eyes and …


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“The Heretics”: Film Invigorates Feminism, Art, Politics
3 comment(s)

Women Are the Solution, Not the Problem

by Talia Carner

At a mid-October U.N. session commemorating the 15th Anniversary of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo, Egypt, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urged the international community to commit resources to improve women's health and gender equality.

How much has changed since 1994? In 2009, across the globe, women are still positioned as far inferior to men in every public sphere—political, religious, legal and economic.

No country is free of “a woman’s problem,” be it full legal rights, maternity care, access …


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Women Are the Solution, Not the Problem
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Third Wave Video Art: Sarcastic and Serious

by Heather MacGibbon

What is Feminist Art? This is a question that art historians and critics have pondered in the last 40 years in the wake of second wave feminism in the U.S. and abroad in the 70s. Is it simply work made by women? Does it espouse a particular philosophic, aesthetic or critical stance toward society?

Lauren Ross answers these questions indirectly with an intriguing look at the work of seven feminist video artists from the last decade in the exhibit she curates,Reflections on the Electric Mirror: New Feminist Video, running through January 10, 2010 at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for …


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Third Wave Video Art: Sarcastic and Serious
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Teens, Freaks, Outlaws and Alternatives to Suicide

by Kate Bornstein

Gender rights are often reduced to the rights of women and the rights of men. But over the past 15 years—by means of postmodern theory, as well as more precise biological confirmation—Western Culture has parsed gender into far more than simply two genders.

I wrote the book, Hello, Cruel World, using gender as a hierarchal system (comprised of more than two) to illustrate the ways in which a hierarchal system of oppression can cause an unaware person to experience suicidal thoughts.  Gender, …


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Teens, Freaks, Outlaws and Alternatives to Suicide

A Poem: Barrettes, Bandages and Butterflies

by Donna Nelson

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.  This poem "Barrettes, Bandages and Butterflies," was inspired by my friend who passed away in April. The poem is about the malignant nature of domestic violence, but also the venomous feeling of entitlement that some human beings feel they possess over another human life. So many mothers have been robbed of the right to witness their daughter’s progression in life because their child’s fate was unjustly decided. Many divine souls have been broken and lost. Since they can no longer speak for themselves, I feel it’s a duty to give them a voice.
 
 


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A Poem: Barrettes, Bandages and Butterflies

The Death of A Dream: Layers of Domestic Violence

by Nancy Genova

The Death of Dream is a play about domestic violence that is slightly different from other artistic pieces that have been developed on the subject. In the play, codependency is acted out so the audience can enter into the victim’s and perpetrator’s space and begin to process what goes on in their world.
 
Initially I wrote The Death of A Dream because I needed to. This piece was tugging at me. I work in health care and have a graduate degree in Public Administration, but I have an undergrad degree in fine arts, as well. I am a survivor of domestic violence. Now it’s as if all my worlds; private, personal, professional and artistic are converging.
 


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The Death of A Dream: Layers of Domestic Violence

In A Word: The True History of "Misogyny"

by Christine E. Hutchins

There is very little new under the sun. Misogyny in art, literature and other records dates as far back in Western culture as documentation itself.
 
Misogyny comes from Greekmisogunia from misos ('hatred') and gyn? ('woman'), explains Answers.com
 
But misogyny as a practice -- the enforcement and celebration of the subordination of women -- flourished unnamed in English until the seventeenth century. 
 
Only when men and women began to write against rather than with culturally entrenched misogynist practices did misogyny get a name in England and …


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In A Word: The True History of "Misogyny"

Southern Reproductive Justice and Trans Alliance

by Sir Jesse of Decatur

Transmen and XX chromosomal men are equally affected by laws designed to chip away at a doctor-patient relationship. People in the reproductive justice community should be allies to those who are trans, gender variant, or have had transgender experience. Often people who were assigned female at birth, or as some would say “born a female,” may have bodies that are configured to the vulnerabilities and horrors that arise when discussing topics of unwanted pregnancy and abortion. All of them, including ”the pregnant man” and others similarly situated, need access to healthcare and reproductive justice …


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Southern Reproductive Justice and Trans Alliance
2 comment(s)

Women in the Arts: How They Can Change Your Life

by Barbara Kahn

The arts—film, theater, music, literature, comic books and graphic novels, fine arts and crafts—influence the image of women in the world, whether we are ignored, misrepresented or stereotyped. Lack of funding and other support puts the depiction of women in the hands of those who are self-sufficient, who have significant financial resources or who consider women as less than equal in the world.

A recent study of 25 women’s funds showed that only 1.5 percent of their grant dollars and 3.3 percent of their grants went to “Arts and Culture.” The study "Accelerating …


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Women in the Arts: How They Can Change Your Life

OPEN DRAG NIGHT AT THE OUTPOST LOUNGE

by Angela Bonavoglia

On a sizzling summer night, I head to the Outpost Lounge in Brooklyn to Switch N' Play's Open Drag Night to watch gender-based performances, mainly by drag kings—who I'd never heard of before this year.
 
I'm greeted at the door by Ellen Vas. I've worked with Ellen and known her as a smart, quick, efficient staffer in a highly regarded Manhattan communications firm. She's also a no frills lesbian, very butch. But tonight, Ellen's not around. In her place is her drag king personae: Manny Mango.
 
Manny's short dark hair is moussed up and spiky. He's sporting long thin sideburns and a

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OPEN DRAG NIGHT AT THE OUTPOST LOUNGE
4 comment(s)

The Ladies' Room: A Complicated Conversation

by Carolyn Gage

The bathroom has been a site of "gender anxiety" historically, as well as a battlefield, and, although it is tempting to write this off to ignorance about gender and fanatical, knee-jerk policing of the "gender binary," the issue goes deeper than this.
 
Rapists do choose public bathrooms as sites of sexual predation, and the presence of men in traditionally female spaces is often dangerous. On the other hand, there is a biological and cultural gender continuum among humans, and a gender binary is oppressive and dangerous for people who are not easily identified, or who do not identify, as male or female. Transgender women and masculine women are harassed and humiliated when …


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The Ladies' Room: A Complicated Conversation
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Rolling with the Role

by Rev. Donna Schaper

Who tells women and girls who we are? Of course it is we who tell us who we are.  Then again, maybe not.  The rhetoric holds that no one tells us who we are; the fact is that many have penetrated our hearts and minds. 
 
The existential and heartfelt reality of gender today, yesterday – but hopefully not tomorrow – is that women give away agency, authority and autonomy. 
 
It comes in quiet ways.  What I hear my heart say is, "I want this, can't have it, don't have the support, the cash, the time, the will.” I have the previous failures of will, insults, sexism, so many reasons that you'd think my heart was filled with others instead of me.  Whoops -- it is.  My …


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Rolling with the Role
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The Dickflick Defined

by Janis Hashe

Two twentysomething women reviewed the movie, Terminator Salvation, in my local Chattanooga paper earlier this summer. "Generally one of three things was happening on screen," wrote one, "something was exploding, a robot was attacking someone, or people were beating each other. Loudly. Very loudly."
 
The other reviewer commented, "Why would the paper send two young women to review a film that is clearly geared toward men?"
 
I was profoundly disappointed that neither of the reviewers put Terminator Salvation into its real genre: Dickflick.
 
For years I have campaigned (so far fruitlessly) against the contemptuous phrase "chickflick," …


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The Dickflick Defined
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Women Still At the Hoops, But Parity Scores Low

by Mary Lou Greenberg

In the Winter 1998 issue of On The Issues Magazine, writer Angell Delaney projected a bright future for women's professional basketball and its influence on breaking traditional gender roles in her article, "A Whole New Ball Game: Playing like a girl is no longer an insult. It's a hoop dream millions aspire to."

For an update on where things are today, On the Issues Magazine talked with Kym Hampton, who at the time of the 1998 article, played center for the New York Liberty, one of the original teams in the

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Women Still At the Hoops, But Parity Scores Low
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